Meeting in a Box: LGBT Pride Month

Our educational tool provides up-to-date statistics and information about historic and current events, all surrounding LGBT Pride Month.

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For June, which is LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender) Pride Month, we're providing a valuable tool to share with all your employees as you continue their education in cultural competence.

This Meeting in a Box tool is designed for distribution to all employees. You may use portions of it or all of it. Each section is available as a separate PDF; you can forward the entire document or link to it on DiversityInc Best Practices; or you can print it out for employees who do not have Internet access.

• Below is a Timeline of barriers that have been broken, major legislation and legal decisions, protests and landmark events impacting LGBT people and their allies.

• Facts & Figures on demographics of open LGBT people; income/buying power/customer loyalty; and major LGBT people in business, sports, entertainment and politics.

• And our cultural-competence series, “Things NOT to Say," focuses on LGBT people this month. This information should be distributed to your entire workforce and used by your LGBT/allies resource group, internally and externally, as a year-round educational tool.

[CLICK HERE to download a PDF of the full Meeting in a Box, our diversity-management training and educational tool available only to Benchmarking customers and DiversityInc Best Practices subscribers.]

1. TIMELINE

The landscape for LGBT rights and being open has changed dramatically over the past few years, perhaps most notably with the legalization of same-gender marriage in June 2015. It's more vital than ever for your workforce to be culturally competent and to understand what LGBT equality means. We recommend you start your employees' cultural-competence lesson by using this Timeline, which documents LGBT organizations, important “firsts," fights against discrimination and significant political and legal changes in the United States. It's important to discuss how rapidly rights for the whole LGBT community are evolving and what that means for corporations, schools, religious institutions and government.

Discussion Questions for Employees

How can we build an atmosphere of inclusion, regardless of our personal or religious views?

Have you ever heard people at work making homophobic comments? What did you do? Do you know what your corporate policies are on hate speech at work? Discuss what it's like for companies located in states like North Carolina and Mississippi and what your company would do in those circumstances.

Why are “firsts" important to note? What other barrier breakers have you witnessed in your lifetime?

This is a personal discussion designed to help employees note other barrier breakers historically. How does someone prominently in the news, like Caitlyn Jenner, impact others in the LGBT community? This discussion can be further explored after the Facts & Figures section below is discussed.

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2. FACTS & FIGURES

After discussion of the Timeline, the next step is to review available data and understand why the ability for more LGBT people to be open and treated equally under the law has profound societal and business implications. It's also critical to note that almost everyone has an LGBT relative or friend, and that straight allies also frequently make purchasing and business decisions based on whether they perceive an organization to be inclusive.

This page includes the DiversityInc Top Companies for LGBT Employees. In compiling this list, we look at best practices that create an inclusive workplace for LGBT employees, as well as relationships with LGBT communities outside of the company. All companies have the Human Rights Campaign Foundation's Corporate Equality Index (CEI) 2018 rating of 100%. Other best practices examined for this list include:

• Having active LGBT employee resource groups

• Percentage of philanthropic endeavors aimed at LGBT nonprofits

• Whether the company attempts to track the number of LGBT employees, including voluntary disclosure

• Whether the company certifies LGBT vendors with the National Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce

• Percentage of procurement spent with certified LGBT vendors

Discussion Questions for Employees

Since many national figures have come out, is it easier for employees in your organization to come out?

How would you feel if you couldn't show a photo of your significant other at work or talk about what you did over the weekend? Discuss if this has gotten better as more prominent people have publicly come out.

Is there a difference for gay and lesbian people coming out and bringing their full selves to work compared to transgender people?

Transgender rights specifically have been brought to the forefront this year, particularly with North Carolina passing its discriminatory bathroom law, which prevents transgender people from using the public restroom that corresponds with their gender identity. Discuss other possible challenges unique to transgender employees.

Why are LGBT people and their allies so loyal to specific customer brands?

How should consumer-facing companies let them know that the company is gay-friendly? How should B-to-B companies communicate to clients about their inclusive culture? Discuss the positive impact this transparency could have on a company's reputation — and its bottom line.

How can you use your resource groups to reach out to the LGBT community and its allies, internally and externally?

Does your company have an LGBT resource group and, if so, are you a member? Does your group have the words “allies, friends or straight" in its title, and does it clearly communicate that it's a group for everyone? Is your group sponsoring community events as well as internal events?

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3. THINGS NOT TO SAY TO LGBT PEOPLE

Our popular “Things NOT to Say" series includes interviews with LGBT leaders about offensive phrases they've heard in the workplace and how to best respond to them to further cultural-competence education.

Discussion Questions for Employees

What other phrases have you heard, often uttered “innocently," in the workplace that are offensive to LGBT people (comments like “That's so gay" or “I don't care about a person's sexual preference")?

When dealing with a transitioning employee, do you know what pronouns are preferred or what questions are considered rude?

Discuss how these phrases and stereotypes impact office morale and productivity.

What active role should the company play when offensive comments occur?

Have the employees talk about under what circumstances they would report offensive comments and what they believe the company should do.

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Meeting in a Box: Memorial Day

This Meeting in a Box includes information and statistics on veterans, as well as insight from veteran executives on what the day really means.

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This Meeting in a Box tool is designed for distribution to all employees. You may use portions of it or all of it. Each section is available as a separate PDF; you can forward the entire document or link to it on DiversityInc Best Practices; or you can print it out for employees who do not have Internet access.

For Memorial Day, we are giving you a valuable tool to share with all your employees as you continue their education in cultural competence. We are supplying a Timeline of military battles, legislation and events impacting veterans and their achievements in the United States; Facts & Figures demonstrating veteran demographics; and “Memorial Day: Think Before You Say 'Thank You For Your Service.'" This information should be distributed to your entire workforce and also should be used by your veterans employee resource group both internally and externally as a year-round educational tool. It also can be particularly valuable to your disability, women's and LGBT employee resource groups.

[CLICK HERE to download a PDF of the full Meeting in a Box, our diversity-management training and educational tool available only to Benchmarking customers and DiversityInc Best Practices subscribers.]

1. Timeline

We recommend you start your employees' cultural-competence lesson on veterans by using this Timeline, which documents significant military operations, legislation and other historic events impacting veterans in the United States.

Discussion Questions for Employees

Why — or why not — have veterans been valued in this country?

Ask employees what contributions veterans have made to their country and why after certain military operations there was more or less support for them. How does treatment and reputation of veterans impact their role in the workplace?

Why have some barriers, such as women in combat and Don't Ask, Don't Tell, been so hard to end?

How do the military, political and social climates in this country impact issues of civil rights in the armed services? How does this affect veterans and their spouses in the private sector?

To view/download a PDF of the Timeline click here.

2. Facts & Figures

After discussion of the Timeline, the next step is to review available data and understand demographics of veterans (important for diversity recruiters) as well as benefits they bring the workplace, such as education, leadership training and ability to act in crisis.

The data we have chosen to present here represents information of relevance to corporate America, such as racial/ethnic, gender, age, education and business ownership (vital for supplier diversity). We also feature the Top 15 Companies for Veterans and the best practices they employ, such as an employee resource group for veterans, having recruitment efforts aimed at veterans, hiring practices aimed at spouses of veterans and increased philanthropic endeavors and supplier diversity for veterans.

Discussion Questions for Employees

Does your company have an employee resource group for veterans?

If not, how would this group benefit your company in increased hiring, engagement and promotion rates? If so, does the group communicate regularly with other employee resource groups, such as groups for people with disabilities? Is the group tasked with improving recruitment, retention and leadership development, as well as community outreach?

Increasingly, veterans' employee resource groups are being used to also help with onboarding and ensure that veterans acclimate to corporate cultures. It's also vital to have their managers and other employees understand veterans to ensure a successful transition to corporate life.

Does your company have a supplier diversity program aimed at veterans and/or veterans with disabilities?

Veteran-owned businesses are a valuable part of your procurement chain and can bring important skills and criteria to your organization. Similarly, vendors owned by people with disabilities and especially veterans with disabilities are increasingly included (and targeted) as vital pieces of the procurement budget.

Does your company publicly support veterans?

Strong support from CEOs, such as Johnson & Johnson's Alex Gorsky and Prudential Financial's John Strangfeld, cements a company's reputation as a supporter for veterans (Prudential Financial is No. 18 on the 2018 Top 18 Companies for Veterans list). This helps with recruitment, engagement, leadership development and procurement.

To view/download a PDF of Facts & Figures click here.

3. Memorial Day: Think Before You Say 'Thank You For Your Service'

Memorial Day tends to be viewed as either another instance of Veterans Day or the unofficial start of summer. But it is not in fact the day to thank a veteran for his or her service. Two veterans spoke with DiversityInc to explain what Memorial Day really is.

Discussion Questions for Employees

Why might Memorial Day be more difficult for some veterans than others?

No two servicemembers' experiences are the same. Discuss why some veterans may be more strongly affected by past experiences on Memorial Day than others.

If you can't say thank you to a living veteran, what can you do to give thanks on Memorial Day?

Connect with your veterans resource group to find out about any volunteer or tribute opportunities you can participate in around this time, such as visiting a veterans cemetery.

To view/download a PDF of the article click here.

Additional Resources: Career Advice on Veterans

PwC's Chris Crace Gives Advice on Overcoming Roadblocks, Getting Back on Track and Not Being Afraid to Fail

PwC's Veteran's Advocacy Leader Chris Crace gives career advice on overcoming roadblocks, getting back on track and not being afraid to fail.

Comcast Veterans Give Advice on Balancing Military and Civilian Careers

Veterans now working for Comcast give advice on transitioning, balancing your military life with the civilian world and more.

Wells Fargo Veterans Give Advice on Transitioning From Military to Civilian Work

Military veterans at Wells Fargo give career advice on transitioning to corporate life, including adapting your leadership and communications style.

Accenture's Tauni Crefeld on Challenges Veterans Face When Transitioning

After leaving the Air Force, Tauni joined Accenture as an analyst — at new joiner level — and 19 years later is a Managing Director in the company's Communications, Media and Technology Consulting practice, leading large complex delivery projects for clients.

EY Manager: To Emerge Stronger Professionally, Veterans Should Employ the Same Resilience Learned While Serving

Ben Bing is a Manager in EY's Advisory services practice and based in the firm's New York City office. Prior to joining EY, he was an Officer in the United States Navy, where he spent 11 years as a Naval Aviator and staff officer.

TIAA's Veteran Focus

Veterans are an important part of TIAA's employee-base and mentorship is crucial to making a transition back to the workforce successful.

Principal at EY: Military Experiences Taught Me I Am The Master of My Own Limitations

Jennifer Kamrowski, Principal in EY's Advisory services practice, talks about her military service and how it set her up for success at EY.

Meeting in a Box: Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month

This educational tool includes a Timeline, Facts & Figures and our popular Things NOT to Say series, all focused on Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month.

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This Meeting in a Box tool is designed for distribution to all employees. You may use portions of it or all of it. Each section is available as a separate PDF; you can forward the entire document or link to it on DiversityInc Best Practices; or you can print it out for employees who do not have Internet access.

For May, which is Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, we are giving you a valuable tool to share with all your employees as you continue their education in cultural competence. We are supplying a Timeline of legislation, which highlights events impacting Asian Americans and their achievements in the United States; Facts & Figures, which demonstrate Asian American advancement (and opportunities) in education and business; and our cultural-competence series “Things NOT to Say" focusing on Asian Americans. This information should be distributed to your entire workforce and also should be used by your Asian employee resource group both internally and externally as a year-round educational tool.

[CLICK HERE to download a PDF of the full Meeting in a Box, our diversity-management training and educational tool available only to Benchmarking customers and DiversityInc Best Practices subscribers.]

1. TIMELINE

We recommend you start your employees' cultural-competence lesson on Asian Americans by using this Timeline, which documents discrimination and oppression of different Asian groups in the United States as well as achievements. It's important to note how recently Asians have been treated inequitably and how issues such as the Japanese internment camps are taught in schools today.

Discussion Questions for Employees

What similarities historically are there among different Asian groups immigrating to the United States? What differences?

Ask the employees why they think there have been so many issues limiting the immigration of Asians and/or limiting their rights once in this country. How do those historic examples of discrimination carry over into the workplace?

Why are “firsts" important to note? What other barrier breakers have you witnessed in your lifetime?

This is a personal discussion designed to help the employees note other barrier breakers historically. This discussion can be further explored after the Facts & Figures section below is discussed.

To view/download a PDF of the Timeline click here.

2. FACTS & FIGURES

After discussion of the Timeline, the next step is to review available data and understand areas in which Asians have made significant progress in the United States but major opportunities remain.

The data we have chosen to present here represent information of relevance to corporate America, such as education (available labor pool), business ownership, and progress in gaining executive and management positions. Where applicable, national data are compared against DiversityInc Top 50 data to show what progress the leading D&I companies are making.

Discussion Questions for Employees

Who do you see as the leading Asian role models in your company?

Have a higher-level discussion on what it takes to become a senior executive at your company, the role of employee resource groups and mentoring in supporting this, and what employees see as valuable ways to increase the pipeline.

Do Asians — men and women — have different employee and management styles than those of other racial/ethnic groups?

Use this teachable moment to honestly discuss different styles, including confrontation/criticism, self-promotion/branding, and decision-making.

To view/download a PDF of the Facts & Figures click here.

3. THINGS NOT TO SAY TO ASIAN AMERICANS

Our popular “Things NOT to Say" series includes interviews with three Asian American leaders about offensive phrases they've heard in the workplace and how best to respond to them to further cultural-competence education.

Discussion Questions for Employees

What other phrases have you heard addressed to Asians and others from underrepresented groups?

Discuss how these phrases and stereotypes impact office morale and productivity.

What role do you think the company should play when offensive comments occur?

Have the employees talk about under what circumstances they would report offensive comments and what they believe the company should do.

After today's lesson, what would you do if you overheard a colleague make one of these comments?

Continue the discussion with each employee having a plan of action on how to address offensive language.

To view/download a PDF of the Things NOT to Say click here.

Meeting in a Box: Black History Month

Our cultural competence toolkit focused on Black History Month.

This Meeting in a Box tool is designed for distribution to all employees. You may use portions of it or all of it.

During this time, employees may not know how to address racial issues in the office. But today's climate has changed. Employees may feel they cannot bring their whole selves to work if they don't think racial issues are up for discussion in the office. This is not true — as long as it's done the right way.

For this reason we are providing additional resources for all employees along with this MIB.

As always, we are providing our Timeline, highlighting events pertaining to Blacks throughout our nation's history and up to the present, as well as our Facts and Figures, giving information on Blacks in corporate America, education statistics and financial figures.

In addition, we are providing links to a host of articles and videos all centered around career advice for Blacks as well as best practices in how companies just like yours are addressing — rather than ignoring — today's racially charged climate. These companies have successfully navigated these real, sometimes painful, conversations.

CLICK HERE to view/download a PDF of the full Meeting in a Box, our diversity-management training and educational tool available only to Benchmarking customers and DiversityInc Best Practices subscribers.

1. Timeline

The unique history of Blacks in the United States is the clearest indication of evolving human-rights values and represents a moral and economic battle that split this nation.

Discussion Questions for Employees

Black History Month started in 1926. Is it still relevant to have a month-long celebration?

Your guided discussion should focus on the many contributions Blacks have made to U.S. history and the continued debate about whether one month is sufficient. Point to examples of recent groundbreaking events. Discussions on new achievements, challenges and victories are always relevant.

Why are “firsts" important to note? What other barrier breakers have you witnessed in your lifetime?

This personal conversation will help employees note additional events that they may not have been aware of.

How does understanding the past help us deal with the present?

Can similarities be drawn between civil rights activism during the era of Rosa Parks and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the goals of today's Black Lives Matter activists?

To view/download a PDF of the Timeline click here.

2. Facts & Figures

Our Facts & Figures section highlights statistics on Blacks in corporate America, as well as disparities among races in educational attainment and income. Where applicable, national data are compared with DiversityInc Top 50 data to show what progress the leading companies are making.

Discussion Questions for Employees

What does it take to move into the senior-executive pipeline at your company? Do you think it's important for younger managers to have role models who look like them?

Discuss the increase — or lack thereof — of Blacks in various management roles. Analyze the benefits of not only cross-cultural mentoring relationships but also the benefits of Black employees having managers and bosses who look like them.

The Black community represents an increasing share of the consumer marketplace. What efforts are you undertaking to reach Black consumers or clients?

As the population grows more diverse, so does your company's need to be able to serve people of all races, ethnicities and backgrounds. Discuss how critical it is to have client/customer-facing staff members who mirror the communities. How active are your resource groups in community, marketplace and client outreach?

To view/download a PDF of the Facts & Figures click here.

3. Career Advice From Black Executives

A DiversityIncBestPractices.com reader survey found that 68% of non-whites feel strongly about receiving career advice from individuals who look like them, while whites don't mind who the advice comes from. Access the survey results here.

Below is career advice from accomplished Black executives on things to focus on to develop your career.

4. Microaggressions

A microaggression is a comment or action that subtly and often unconsciously, or unintentionally, expresses a prejudiced attitude toward a member of a marginalized group.

Below are videos on how to handle microaggressions.

How to Respond to 'I Don't See Color in the Workplace'

5. Leadership Profiles

Black executives give insights on how they developed and maintained a successful career.

6. Racial Discussions in the Office

Webinar: Should Senior Leaders Address Racial Tensions in the U.S.?

EY gives insights into why senior business leaders should address racial tension in the U.S. in their organizations.

3 Ways to Enhance Your Executive Presence

Mimi Brent, Head of Global Career Development at GM gives three ways to enhance your executive presence.

Mimi Brent, Head of Global Career Development at GM gives three ways to enhance your executive presence, including being a powerful communicator and handling conflict well.

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About Mimi Brent

Mimi is an expert and proven leader in global learning, talent development and global communications. She excels at strategy and has led multiple global teams to launch innovative, large-scale global learning and HR solutions. As head of GM's Global Career Development team, Mimi:

• Led the design, development and launch of multiple corporate-wide career development initiatives for over 80,000 global salaried employees resulting in increased employee mobility and engagement.

• Internally developed and deployed a career development portal with multimedia resources (including mentoring) to engage employees and leaders in active career discussions.

• Launched a global communication strategy resulting in increased monthly usage of career resources.

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